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The Time Traveller’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger

the-time-travelers-wife

Plot in 100 Words:

Niffenegger’s debut novel is a love story of sorts. Henry deTamble has a distinctive genetic disorder where he tends to travel unexpectedly and involuntarily back and forth through time. During one of his time travel incidents, Henry meets a mesmerizing girl named Clare Abshire. Soon enough they become friends and from thereon life long lovers. They get married and eventually things become onerous for Clare, because Henry is absent so much of the time, she becomes lonely and also fears and worries for his safety during some severe time-travel encounters. The novel revolves around their struggle to overcome this separation.

 Writing Style:

The writing style is in first person narrative. A lot of poetry, including some French, is incorporated into the book. I also found the language to be very metaphoric.

I wouldn’t recommend this book to people willing to improve their language skills.

 Recommendation:

I would recommend it for ages 16+ due to some sexual content.

My Favorite Part/Quote:

 Clare is sitting in her mother’s room after the later passes away, and stumbles upon a poem her mother wrote for her.

“The Garden Under Snow

for clare

 

now the garden is under snow

a blank page our footprints write on

clare who was never mine

but always belonged to herself

Sleeping Beauty

a crystalline blanket

she waits

this is her spring

this is her sleeping/awakening

she is waiting

everything is waiting

for a kiss

the improbable shapes of tubers roots

I never thought

my baby

her almost face

   a garden, waiting”

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The Zahir

bigpreview_Walle Looks At the Night Sky
Far away and distant,
Wandering in coal fields,
There are things I say to its darkness,
Things that burden me.

Miles and miles apart
Lives my old friend,
Beneath a violet tree,
He sings to the stars.

We shared a story once,
An unforgotten tale,
One that kept us laughing
One that we wept upon.

Gone like sand from a palm,
Time escaped our glass,
These words will reach you,
When music stops from my heart.

Lay me down on a bed of roses,
Cover me with a sheet of tears,
Bid me the sweetest farewell,
Tonight I’ll sleep well o’friend.

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The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins

hungergames1

Plot in 100 Words: 

Set in a dystopian era, Panem; a nation consisting of twelve burdened districts. Anually, an arena is set up for the brutal hunger games for which one boy and one girl, from each district, are chosen to compete. They must battle it out to the death. This time, from district twelve, our protagonist Katniss Everdeen is chosen to battle against twenty-three other ‘tributes’. In this first book of the Hunger games trilogy, Everdeen narrates her struggles, in the arena, as she tries to protect her new-found friends from violent enemies and speaks of her fight to save her companion, Peeta.

Writing Style:

This is definitely not a book that contains explicit use of language, and imagery. Although, Collins has a undeniable gift for plotting and that’s what makes the hunger games a compelling read. Its a story that is abundant with suspense. After Harry Potter, this is one great book to dig those ‘speculative fictional’ talons into. Of course, each series carries it’s own charisma.

Recommendation:

I recommend this book to anyone who is smitten by science fiction and also for ages 16+ due to some violence and sexual content.

My Favorite Part/Quote:

This lullaby is sung by Katniss, as she sits under the towering canopies. A petit girl, with frizzy hair lies on her lap, sniffing her last few breaths. The lullaby is the latter’s song.

“Deep in the meadow, under the willow
A bed of grass, a soft green pillow
Lay down your head, and close your sleepy eyes
And when again they open, the sun will rise.

Here it’s safe, here it’s warm
Here the daisies guard you from every harm
Here your dreams are sweet and tomorrow brings them true
Here is the place where I love you.

Deep in the meadow, hidden far away
A cloak of leaves, a moonbeam ray
Forget your woes and let your troubles lay
And when again it’s morning, they’ll wash away.

Here it’s safe, here it’s warm
Here the daisies guard you from every harm
Here your dreams are sweet and tomorrow brings them true
Here is the place where I love you.”

Verdict: 7.4/10

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Catching Fire – Suzanne Collins

catching_fire_book_cover_new_by_tributedesign-d5mxuq3

Plot in 100 Words:

Unrest and ire awaken in the twelve burdened districts, long awaiting a single spark of fire. But Katniss Everdeen, the girl on fire, has set of much more than an infinitesimal spark, involuntarily. Her audacious act, with Peeta Mellark, of pulling the poisonous berries has fumed a disastrous rebellion against the Capitol. She is the very symbol of this bold uprising, the mockingjay. The furious and power hungry Capitol knows what’s at stake so deceitfully it sets off, slithering, to seek it’s menacing vengeance. This is the sequel to the famous Hunger Games and it’s jam-packed with action and terror.

Writing Style:

This is definitely not a book that contains explicit use of language, and imagery. Although, Collins has a undeniable gift for plotting and that’s what makes the hunger games a compelling read. Its a story that is abundant with suspense. After Harry Potter, this is one great book to dig those ‘speculative fictional’ talons into. Of course, each series carries it’s own charisma.

Recommendation:

I recommend this book to anyone who is smitten by science fiction and also for ages 16+ due to some violence and sexual content.

My Favorite Part/Quote:

In this scene, Collins announces the protagonist’s reaction on being in an arena for the second time and her response on first glance.

 “…. Slowly I raise my eyes and take in the water spreading out in every direction. I can only form one clear thought.

This is no place for a girl on fire.”

Verdict: 7.2/10

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Mockingjay – Suzanne Collins

Mockingjay

Plot in 100 Words:

After being pulled to saftey from the arena of quarter quell, Katniss Everdeen is taken by rebels to the before-superficial District 13. She, the face of this revolution, unknowingly has been a part of a well-plotted uprising, an uprising which extripated her home, entirely. Although her family and Gale are secure, her main concern is Peeta who lies in the clutches of Capitol’s President, Snow. In this epilogue of The Hunger Games, Everdeen must serve as the rebels’ mockingjay to emancipate peeta and once and for all put an end to Snow’s reign, even if it means she has to sacrifice all.

Writing Style:

This is definitely not a book that contains explicit use of language, and imagery. Although, Collins has a undeniable gift for plotting and that’s what makes the hunger games trilogy a compelling read. Its a story that is abundant with suspense. After Harry Potter, this is one great book to dig those ‘speculative fictional’ talons into. Of course, each series carries it’s own charisma.

Recommendation:

I recommend this book to anyone who is smitten by science fiction and also for ages 16+ due to some violence and sexual content.

My Favorite Part/Quote:

In this scene, the protagonist is in the woods and the ambiance of the environment triggers the remembrance of a song her father used to sing to her.

“Are you, are you
Coming to the tree
Where they strung up a man they say murdered three.
Strange things did happen here
No stranger would it be
If we met up at midnight in the hanging tree.

Are you, are you
Coming to the tree
Where the dead man called out for his love to flee.
Strange things did happen here
No stranger would it be
If we met up at midnight in the hanging tree.

Are you, are you
Coming to the tree
Where I told you to run, so we’d both be free.
Strange things did happen here
No stranger would it be
If we met up at midnight in the hanging tree

Are you, are you
Coming to the tree
Wear a necklace of rope, side by side with me.
Strange things did happen here
No stranger would it be
If we met up at midnight in the hanging tree.”

Verdict: 7.5/10

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Venting

Every tear is a memory returned,
Every Drop is a moment remembered,
An ocean surrounds me,
Deep, dark, dreadful,
On the edge of a broken raft,
Almost drowning, 
Almost dying.
 
The nights almost upon me,
My loneliness capturing me,
Chains of wrath,
Bittersweet haze lingers in the air,
I breath, not what’s vital,
But what’s gone,
On the edge of life,
Almost stifling,
Almost dying.
 
Boundless auras pull me,
More salt,
More pain,
More desolation,
I’m on the edge to God,
Almost falling,
Almost Dying.

broken down raft

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Life of Pi – Yann Martel

Life of Pi - Book review

Plot in 100 Words:

This story is an ever-bewildering tale of an Indian boy, Piscine, or better known as Pi. Due to a land dispute, he and his family are forced to flee and export their entire zoo to Canada, by ship. Tragically, the ship sinks after a ferocious storm, leaving Pi with a spotted Hyena, an injured Zebra, an Orangutan and a Bengal tiger, on a small lifeboat. Life of Pi speaks of Pi’s miraculous 227 days of survival and also articulates that sincere faith and love for God can allow us to overcome anything. The ending leaves the reader in deep thought.

Writing Style:

Martel has an extraordinary gift of describing details to utmost perfection. This is something that remains evident and profound throughout the novel, and this endowment is what implores the reader to go on.

Recommendation:

This fictional work should be read by anyone willing to improve their language skills and more specifically their descriptive skills, or anyone whose looking for a perplexing book to devour.

My Favorite Part/Quote:

This is a scene where the protagonist of the novel comes face to face with the bengal tiger, Richard Parker. He describes the appearance of the 450 Pound animal.

“I wish I could describe what happened next, not as I saw it, which I might manage, but as I felt it. I beheld Richard Parker from the angle that showed him off to greatest effect: from the back, half-raised, with his head turned. The stance had something of a pose to it, as if it were an intentional, even affected, display of mighty art. And what art, what might. His presence was overwhelming, yet equally evident was the lithesome grace of it. He was incredibly muscular, yet his haunches were thin and his glossy coat hung loosely on his frame. His body, bright brownish orange streaked with black vertical stripes, was incomparably beautiful, matched with a tailor’s eye for harmony by his pure white chest and underside and the black rings of his long tail. His head was large and round, displaying formidable sideburns, a stylish goatee and some of the finest whiskers of the cat world, thick, long and white. Atop the head were small, expressive ears shaped like perfect arches. His carrot orange face had a broad bridge and a pink nose, and it was made up with brazen flair. Wavy dabs of black circled the face in a pattern that was striking yet subtle, for it brought less attention to itself than it did to the one part of the face left untouched by it, the bridge, whose rufous lustre shone nearly with a radiance. The patches of white above the eyes, on the cheeks and around the mouth came off as finishing touches worthy of a Kathakali dancer. The result was a face that looked like the wings of a butterfly and bore an expression vaguely old and Chinese. But when Richard Parker’s amber eyes met mine, the stare was intense, cold and unflinching, not flighty or friendly, and spoke of self-possession on the point of exploding with rage. His ears twitched and then swivelled right around. One of his lips began to rise and fall. The yellow canine thus coyly revealed was as long as my longest finger.

Every hair on me was standing up, shrieking with fear.”

This is another pick from the novel where Pi informs us about what the pacific looked like as he gazes down upon it.

“I heard a splash. I looked down at the water. I gasped. I thought I was alone. The stillness in the air, the glory of the light, the feeling of comparative safety-all had made me think so. There is commonly an element of silence and solitude to peace, isn’t there? It’s hard to imagine being at peace in a busy subway station, isn’t it? So what was all this commotion?

With just one glance I discovered that the sea is a city. Just below me, all around, unsuspected by me, were highways, boulevards, streets and roundabouts bustling with submarine traffic. In water that was dense, glassy and flecked by millions of lit-up specks of plankton, fish like trucks and buses and cars and bicycles and pedestrians were madly racing about, no doubt honking and hollering at each other. The predominant colour was green. At multiple depths, as far as I could see, there were evanescent trails of phosphorescent green bubbles, the wake of speeding fish. As soon as one trail faded, another appeared. These trails came from all directions and disappeared in all directions. They were like those time-exposure photographs you see of cities at night, with the long red streaks made by the tail lights of cars. Except that here the cars were driving above and under each other as if they were on interchanges that were stacked ten storeys high. And here the cars were of the craziest colours. The dorados-there must have been over fifty patrolling beneath the raft-showed off their bright gold, blue and green as they whisked by. Other fish that I could not identify were yellow, brown, silver, blue, red, pink, green, white, in all kinds of combinations, solid, streaked and speckled. Only the sharks stubbornly refused to be colourful. But whatever the size or colour of a vehicle, one thing was constant: the furious driving. There were many collisions-all involving fatalities, I’m afraid-and a number of cars spun wildly out of control and collided against barriers, bursting above the surface of the water and splashing down in showers of luminescence. I gazed upon this urban hurly-burly like someone observing a city from a hot-air balloon. It was a spectacle wondrous and awe-inspiring. This is surely what Tokyo must look like at rush hour.

I looked on until the lights went out in the city.”

Verdict: 6.0/10

Life-of-Pi-scene-2

*Cold Plays Paradise playing in the background*